February 28, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 9

Leviticus is traditionally the point in yearly Bible reading plans that really determine whether or not you will see the plan to completion. It’s understandable, because many of the things we see in this book are difficult to understand and apply to our lives. So today I want us to slow down and really look at this chapter and how it can impact us today.

1. Sin is serious.

In chapter 9, we see again the need for ritual and sacrifice because of sin. The sacrifices that must be in place are for both the priests and the people, showing that no one is untouched by the curse of sin. The same is true for us: pastors or ministry leaders are just as much in need of the grace of God as anyone else who is involved in their ministry. Sin touches everyone and is so serious that it requires death and sacrifice.

2. Sin robs the glory of God.

We see that one of the purposes of the sacrifice is so that the glory of God might appear to the people:

5 And they brought what Moses commanded in front of the tent of meeting, and all the congregation drew near and stood before the LORD. 6 And Moses said, “This is the thing that the LORD commanded you to do, that the glory of the LORD may appear to you.” (ESV)

In order for the glory of God to be a main part of your life, your sin has to be dealt with.

3. Sin must be dealt with.

In the Old Testament, we see that the way that God deals with sin is with a sacrifice that must be done regularly. That is what makes the sacrifice of Jesus so much better. Jesus dying on the cross for our sin and rising again is the once for all act that swiftly and completely deals with sin. All it takes is believing in Jesus and repenting of your sin, and your sin can also be taken away once and for all.

By: Graham Withers — Pastoral Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

February 27, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 8

In chapter 1-7 of Leviticus we see laws and descriptions about the various sacrifices God commanded His people to offer. In the next 3 chapters God will switch gears and address the priests as the main theme. Chapter 8 is specifically about their “ordination” or “consecration” for service… How they were dedicated and set apart.

As we study this keep this in mind: This is important because God calls all of His people to serve, and we respond by publically committing ourselves to serve, consecrating ourselves for service, living pure lives befitting of servants of God, and walking in fellowship with Him while we serve Him. (Moseley, 84)

When seeing Leviticus 8 and how it applies to the New Testament Church we see that God, through Jesus, has eliminated the need for a human priest because of the great high priest we have in Jesus (Hebrews 4:12-16) and how now we all, as followers of Jesus, are in the royal priesthood (1 Peter 2:19) but understanding this text still matters.

We see that as God called Aaron to serve through Moses (v.1-2). God called him to take Aaron and his sons and anoint and consecrate them publicly (v.3). Being a servant of God is a big deal and this brings accountability. Here is what we know… “Whether someone is called to vocational ministry or not, all followers of Jesus are called to ministry of some kind… to serve God.” (Moseley, 87).

Moses also, while committing publically and consecrating  them to serve God(v. 3, 10-13) gave them a role. We see this in the garments that were given in v. 5-9 (we can read more about the significance in Exodus 28). Just like this, God has a special place for all of us, as followers of Jesus, to serve in His church. 

Aaron sought purification before serving… he offered a sacrifice (v.14-17). He did this because it is hard for us to serve God while living in any kind of impurity. We will not be perfect but we must continually seek forgiveness and restoration. Power for impact comes from HIM and when we sin we stifle this impact. This also foreshadows Jesus and all He does for us in this.

We see Aaron’s dedication to serve through the offering in verses 22-29. Aaron was showing that he was all in… he was ready… he was dedicated. We dedicate every part of ourselves to God. 

Finally we see the fellowship that he had with God through serving. Verse 31 symbolized an ordination meal that they ate. Eating together symbolized fellowship. They were eating in the presence of God. The meal was for them. It was a symbol of their fellowship. 

Like many of you, serving has brought to me some of the greatest joys of my life. I can’t believe that I get to wake up everyday and serve God. You get to as well. Yes we serve in the church but we also serve outside of the church! As I serve, as God has commanded, I experience Him in greater and greater ways. It is what I am designed to do! 

How can you jump in and serve God and His church this week?

By: Nick Parsons — Pastoral Ministry Associate: College


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

February 26, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 7

The last two chapters focused on WHEN the guilt offering was to be sacrificed. This chapter focuses on HOW it was to be offered. The first 10 verses describe what to do with the different elements involved in the sacrifice, similar to previous offerings, and it subsidizes different elements that can be used for other offerings (burnt and grain). The remainder of the chapter then deals with the peace offering and the different motivations behind it. Verses 12-15 shows how there is thanksgiving involved with the sacrifice. Verse 16 shows how a vow or covenant takes place and the remainder of the chapter deals with consecration where they are cut off from other people for the purposes of the offering.

It’s easy to look at all of these details and see how this offering and sacrifice was a true foreshadowing of the sacrifice of Jesus, even outside of the part with atonement/substitutionary sacrifice. From the thanksgiving we feel when receiving it to the covenant that takes place between you and God, how we’re then consecrated for His purpose and holiness.

By: Erik Koliser — West Campus Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

February 25, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 6

While some people find Leviticus as enthralling as paint drying, it’s quite an amazing book. Leviticus has little payoff without deep and intentional study. A casual reading is probably not going to produce the deep-down impact that it can if you really take your time. All that to say, this book is all about being “Holy.” Everything is designed to produce a peculiar people specially set apart for God’s purpose to be in a relationship with Him and to be salt and light in a pagan world.

Remember your audience: Leviticus was written during the time that Israel wandered in the desert after escaping Egypt. It was written by the same guy that just finished writing Genesis—Moses. As such, they have recently been reading and hearing all about their origins and how they came to be wondering around the desert. Specifically, there is a great deal in Leviticus that reminds the reader of Genesis 3, when sin entered the world and God immediately made a sacrifice.

Leviticus has a lot to say regarding what it calls “uncleanness.” Uncleanness is not necessarily sin. Recovering from uncleanness may have many solutions while atoning for sin requires a sacrifice. This also helps us understand why blood shall not be eaten. Blood is life and can only be offered back to God—the giver of life. Notice also that any pottery that was used in boiling a sin offering had to be smashed (28). Sin brings destruction.

As we read through Leviticus, we are reminded that God dwelt in the midst of these people. The Tabernacle was made and erected right in the middle of all people. Notice that when the people sinned, they were not made to leave the camp. Instead, they were commanded to go to the center of their community, to the dwelling of the Lord, and there, present a bloody sacrifice. That shed blood was a picture of what they deserved—their sin deserved their blood—but God is gracious and accepts the substitution.

The idea that God can’t be in the presence of sin isn’t entirely accurate. God commands sinners to come to Him in their sin. When sin pushes us to run, God says “Draw near.” God isn’t afraid of sin nor is he corrupted by sin. This is good news for us. That means when we mess up, when we sin, we don’t need to run away. In our sin we must run to God. We must remind ourselves of Jesus’ bloody sacrifice, recognizing that it should have been us bleeding for our sin. Yet, God, in His grace, accepts the substitution.

By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.