August 8, 2020

Today you should read: 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12

Paul’s reasoning for writing this passage comes in verses 1-2. The Thessalonians had believed a false claim about the second coming of Jesus. They thought that Jesus had already come back for a second time and they were left on earth. You can imagine the panic in their hearts. But Paul assures them that two things must happen before Jesus comes back: (1) a rebellion and (2) the revelation of the ‘man of lawlessness’. When the ‘man of lawlessness’ is revealed, he will come proclaiming to be God (v. 4). His mission comes from Satan (v. 9). But those who follow him will be sent into delusion from God because they did not believe the truth (v. 11-12). 

This is definitely a difficult passage to understand, and sometimes we have to be okay with not understanding. We are not meant to know all things. If we did, there would be no reason for God. But we do not understand everything, and we just have to have faith in the good and righteous God we serve. 

We may not understand everything in this passage, but there is one thing that is clear. Jesus will have the final victory (v. 8). The ‘man of lawlessness’ will be killed by the breath of Jesus. Jesus has already won, but there will be a day when everyone knows about it!

By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

August 7, 2020

Today you should read: 2 Thessalonians 1:1-12

When stepping into a new Bible book it’s always helpful to remind ourselves of the context and flow. Check out the Bible Project summary here.

2nd Thessalonians 1 packs a whole lot into relatively few verses. Paul begins the body of the letter by telling the Thessalonians how he brags on them for their faithfulness in suffering (4). Paul clearly states that their suffering will be repaid to those who are the cause of that affliction while they will receive rest (6–7). 

The wicked oppressors will face the penalty of eternal destruction, away from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of His power (9). We commonly call Hell the place where that happens—eternal destruction away from God’s glory and presence. We understand from this passage and others that the destruction is eternal; meaning a person/soul is not destroyed in a final annihilation sense, but in a continual painful process that never ends. The destruction itself is eternal.

As bad as Hell will be for those who never accept Christ, an eternity with Christ will be that much better (Rom 8:18). Paul said that he rejoices because “our testimony to you was believed.” Understanding the truth about who Christ is and what He accomplished begins by trusting in the Word that tells us that information. We must believe and trust that Paul and the others’ testimony recorded in Scripture. On the backside of salvation, we can look to our experience in a personal relationship with Jesus, but even that is grounded in the truth of the revelation recorded by the apostles and prophets. We do not worship Christ apart from the Word. So, in that sense, this is an incredibly important and powerful detail. One day we will marvel when Christ comes to be glorified in His saints

Eternal punishment and eternal reward are an incredible aspect of our faith. In Christ, we need not fear Hell. Likewise, if what excites you most about Heaven isn’t a closer relationship with Jesus, you might reconsider the content of your hope. As we see in this passage it is right to hope for a day when suffering will end, but our glory and our hope is in the Servant who Suffered, not the escape of suffering.

I don’t know about you, but reading this passage, I think of those who do not know Christ and how much they need Him. May we, like Paul, share faithfully and prayerfully that our testimony is believed. Living for Him and living in light of the Gospel, may Paul’s prayer be true of us that the name of our Lord Jesus will be glorified in you, and you in Him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.  

By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

August 6, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 52

This book concludes with the fall of Jerusalem. We see Zedekiah participating in and leading Jerusalem in sin and facing dire consequences for such actions. His eyes are plucked out and it leads to their temple being burned and God’s people being exiled to Babylon. As hard and horrible as this was we see at the very end of the book grace upon the king of Judah as he was imprisoned and we know that although God’s people were imprisoned and enslaved, the Davidic lineage would be preserved in order for Jesus, the messiah to come.

No matter how hard our circumstances are or the consequences of our sin that seem to pile up, we can know and trust that God preserves His promises and sovereign in His reign. 

By: Erik Koliser — West Campus Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

August 5, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 51

Jeremiah is a constant reminder that God keeps His word, and in this case, it means the destruction of Babylon. Well, then the question becomes, why does He want to destroy Babylon? Didn’t he use them to punish Israel?

He is punishing Babylon for the violence against his people. In Matthew 25:40, Jesus uses a parable to illustrate this same thing. The sin in your life is a personal attack against God. Whether it is slander, lust, malice, or deceit. God makes the point here that he takes it personally. God used the sin of Babylon, but it does not excuse them from the consequences of it. 

There is a price that has to be paid for sin. In Romans, it says “the wages of sin is death.” If you’re a Christian, Jesus took that punishment for us. Babylon is an example of a future that awaits those who chose to not trust in Jesus. Their death is eternal death in hell. Babylon’s punishment is that they would be destroyed and would never rise again. This is still true today.

You won’t find the nation of Babylon on a map today. They are lost because of their choice to choose sin and evil. Although our flesh wants to follow the same path, choose the path of light that leads to salvation. Flee from sin in your life.

By: Jacob Kerr — West Campus Pastoral Ministry Apprentice – Worship & Students


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.