July 4, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 28

When reading Jeremiah 28, it is important to understand what happens directly before this. In Jeremiah 27:22, God tells Jeremiah, “Then I will bring them back and restore them to this place.” In that section, God is talking about the things of the Temple, but it can also be implied that God is talking about Israel as a whole. Israel will be taken to Babylon and serve them, but God will bring them back. 

This leads to our passage because Hananiah comes onto the scene and proclaims that God will restore Israel in two years. Hananiah said he received revelation from the Lord and this is what was going to happen. This actually makes Jeremiah happy because he wants Israel to be brought back into the land (v. 6). But, as we see from the passage, Hananiah was lying and he did not actually receive this revelation (v. 13-16). God then punishes Hananiah by ending his life because of the wickedness (v. 17). 

For us, we need to be careful about the Pastors and Teachers that we are listening to. Hananiah tricked many people into believing his words. The problem is that his words were not true. In the same way, there are false teachers still in our world today. People who claim “truth” but really just state their opinion and use God/the Bible in whatever way they want to. Our job is to watch for false teachers, not listen to their lies, and call them out for their wickedness. Always pay attention to the Biblical teachers in your life. Make sure that what they say aligns with what God has to say through His Word. 

My challenge to you this week is to examine your teachers. Examine if they are truly basing everything they are saying off of Scripture. Ask yourself, “Is the Bible the driving force behind their teaching?” It never hurts to ask these questions. It will show you one of two things: (1) you need to stop listening to them or (2) it will give you better confidence in them. 

By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

July 3, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 27

Sometimes we forgot how in control God is at all times. We look at the pandemic, murders, war, famine, and natural disasters and perceive the world as being in total chaos. Which to us would be totally out of control. There is nothing you or I can do to stop a tornado if it was heading straight for our houses. The world is trying to come up with a solution for COVID 19 and we don’t have any so we perceive it as completely out of control.

The problem with that outlook is that sometimes I think we put God in the same position as us. We don’t trust that he is in control, but verse 5 tells us something about God when it says, “It is I who by my great power and my outstretched arm have made the earth, with the men and animals that are on the earth, and I give it to whomever it seems right to me.”

To the Israelites, things probably seemed out of control. This nation has come in and taken over. The people want to take matters into their own hands and rebel against him, but God says these words to his people. He says this not to stop the conflict, but instead to remind the people that he is still in control. That’s something that we should continue to remember today. That God is in control!

By: Jacob Kerr — West Campus Pastoral Ministry Apprentice – Students & Worship


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

July 2, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 26

In this chapter, we see Jeremiah boldly stand for truth in the midst of error. We see that the people were living in evil and God was sending Jeremiah to them to proclaim the truth and not hold back (v.3)… This was not in hatred… this was in grace. We know it was in grace because of the purpose in (v.3) – “that I may relent of the disaster I intend to do to them because of their evil deeds..” 

Just like we studied about in Jeremiah 21… God is holy. He cannot let evil fester uncontrollably forever. At some point, He has to put a stop to it or He would not be holy. But in His grace, He always desires restoration. This is what we are seeing here.

So, Jeremiah goes to them and proclaims the truth of God and they want to kill him. This should not surprise us. This happens all over the world even today. Truth is offensive. This is why we live in an anti-truth world. But truth must be proclaimed in a righteous, loving, gentle, and gracious way. Jeremiah didn’t fight them… He kindly reminded them that God is the one who sent him to them and that he was doing it for their good (v.13)… Ultimately we see God save him (v.16-24).

We look at stories like this in awe, cheering Jeremiah on for proclaiming truth because it is someone else and it is in the past. We often forget (or choose not to remember) that we have the same job in the present as followers of Jesus. We have to proclaim the truth of Jesus to a broken world. It may sound offensive but it brings ultimate restoration to souls, relationships, societies, and countries. It is what our world needs.

Though we need to be kind, loving, gentle, and gracious… we cannot sacrifice truth on the altar of tolerance.  Jesus has called us to be loving & gentle in our actions but not soft in our stand for truth.

This is hard in our world right now. It is hard to stand for what is right. It is hard to have our thoughts shaped by the truth of God’s word and the gospel. It is hard to speak truth into tough situations with love, grace, and gentleness. But we must. We must stand strong for what God stands strong for. A lot is at stake.

Ultimately, we have an amazing opportunity to show people HOW GOOD Jesus is. How wholesome He is. How restorative He is. Ultimately, we get to show them that they have a creator and Father in heaven who loves them, desires them, and died for them. I can’t think of a better truth to stand for.

Pray today for Christians all over the world who are standing for the truth of Jesus and being persecuted for it. They are being beaten, jailed, and killed. Pray that God would give them (and us) the strength to stand.

By: Nick Parsons — Pastoral Ministry Associate – College


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

July 1, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 25:15-38

The end of Jeremiah 25 is all about God’s wrath which often gets a bad wrap. That’s because we live in a day and age where we have set ourselves as the judge and God’s Holy character and righteousness has been put on trial.

“How can a loving God send people to hell?”

“Why does God punish people for their sin?”

Or in the case for today’s scripture… “How can God be so angry?”

With such illustrations as treading grapes in a vineyard or imagery such as one rolling in the dead’s ashes, one could question the purpose of God’s wrath.

But we should be reminded that God’s wrath is overall just. Like J.I. Packer said in his classic “Knowing God” 

God’s wrath in the Bible is never the capricious, self-indulgent, irritable, morally ignoble thing that human anger so often is. It is, instead, a right and necessary reaction to objective moral evil”

God’s wrath is also His love in action against sin. His wrath was just as present in the cross of Jesus when he took our punishment and sin upon Himself as it was in Jeremiah 25 toward those who sinned against God. God’s love and justice are two sides of the same coin that glorify Him. His wrath is ultimately satisfied in Christ and that two sided coin is most evident in the Gospel.

By: Erik Koliser — West Campus Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.