January 18, 2016

Today you should read: Genesis 12:10-20

A Time Of Not Trusting God

Abram, the chosen patriarch, chooses to not trust God.  In our story today, Abram decides to trust in his deception rather than his God.

What does he do?  He articulates that Sarai is his sister, rather than his wife, out of fear that he will be killed by those who don’t fear God.  

Now this brings up a lot of questions, like:  Why did God still bless and protect Abram even though he lied?  What about Abraham’s statement in Genesis 20 about Sarah being his half-sister?  Is lying justified in certain endangering situations?  These are all good questions.

What we do know is this was indeed deception, a half-truth at the very least, and the reasoning was because Abram didn’t trust God.  Abram wasn’t perfect, just like every character in the Bible.  But what we also know is that the God whom Abram didn’t trust was the same God who delivered him from the very thing he was afraid of.

Today’s “Walk-a-Way”

There are times in our lives that are very scary.  Just like Abram was called by God to go to and through some pretty scary places, literally and figuratively, so God calls us.  And just like Abram was tempted to trust in himself rather than God, so we will be tempted to do the same thing.  But when we are tempted, we should choose to trust God to protect and deliver us from what we are afraid of, not our own wits, strength, or lies.

Here are questions we can ask ourselves, today:

What am I afraid of, and consequently not trusting God for?

What would trusting Him in this situation look like?

By: Sam Cirrincione

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Author: cpclexington

Lexington & Richmond KY

5 thoughts on “January 18, 2016”

  1. Interestingly, when pharaoh sends Abram away he allows him to keep his possessions, presumably including everything that pharaoh gave him. I wonder why?

  2. “He permitted no man to oppress them,
    And He reproved kings for their sakes:
    Do not touch My anointed ones,…” Psalm 105:14-15

    Looking back through the corridors of life, one can see more clearly the hand of the Lord guiding and protecting me and my family. When has a subtle deception seemed wiser than the truth?

    I am so thankful that God is slow to anger at my foolish sinfulness, He is more just and caring and merciful than anyone can be, and He provides gentle instruction to guide my heart: toward wisdom, away from folly, to the foot of the cross of my Savior.

    Does not the sin of a righteous man give us cause to reflect on our own attitude of self-reliance? This is that opportunity for me today.

    Now, rise up. Be refreshed. Remember who you are, and whose you are. Go serve your King.

  3. v.10b) forcing Abram to go down to Egypt, where he lived as a foreigner.

    It’s interesting to me how this verse becomes a recurring theme for God’s chosen people. Abraham-Isaac-Jacob/Israel-Joseph. The great grandsons of Abraham will also “go down to Egypt” because of a great famine. Abram lied about Sarai being his sister rather than his wife. Jacob deceived his father Isaac and stole his brother’s birthright. The sons of Jacob deceived their father into believing that Joseph was dead. I think it’s fair to say this family was a TRAIN WRECK filled with lying, deceiving, and all manner of sin.

    Aren’t you glad God uses us, in our brokenness, to achieve His purposes? Even though these men are super-heroes of the faith they were flawed men who made mistakes and sinned greatly. I am grateful for a God who takes my brokenness and allows me to be part of His plan if I will simply repent and turn my heart to Him.

    Thanks for the commentary Sam!

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