June 6, 2017

Today you should read: Psalm 49

In today’s Psalm, we are seeking to answer the question, “Why should I fear in times of trouble?” The ESV has that as the title to the Psalm, but the entire Psalm revolves around verses 5 & 6, where the question is asked:

Why should I fear in times of trouble,
    when the iniquity of those who cheat me surrounds me,
those who trust in their wealth
    and boast of the abundance of their riches? (ESV)

The day of trouble here is asking what we should do when we treated unfairly by those around us who are boasting of the riches they have. Two main things stand out when trying to answer this question:

  1. The foolishness of seeing riches and the temporal as ultimate.
  2. The wisdom of trusting God and the eternal as ultimate.

The Psalm discusses the fact that all (wise, foolish, rich, poor) will die. When death comes, their riches or their earthly glory does not come with them. The psalmist calls this having “foolish confidence” (v. 13). In contrast, verses 15-20 shows the wisdom in placing our confidence in the eternal things of God. This is why we are able to not fear in the day of trouble.

The commandment “thou shall not covet” exposes within our hearts a propensity to be envious of the successes and possessions of others. The Biblical answer to this is contentment in God; rejoicing in who God is and what He has provided for us. There is great joy and freedom in loving God so deeply that all other options seem immaterial.

What does how you view possessions and the achievements of others say about your love for God? If you constantly find yourself envious of others, confess this to the Lord and ask Him to change your heart to desire Him above all else.

As we close I wanted to offer a practical way to work through the Psalms with us this summer: Pray the Psalms. Allow the Psalms to not only be read, but be a guide for your prayer life as well. Here are some helpful resources on what this looks like:

Article: How to Pray through the Psalms

What stood out to you from today’s Psalm? Have you ever prayed through Scripture before? Comment below!

By: Graham Withers — Pastoral Ministry Apprentice

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Author: cpclexington

Lexington & Richmond KY

13 thoughts on “June 6, 2017”

  1. Verse 7 says, no man can by any means redeem his brother or give to God a ransom for him. The prospects of death seems to right-size or capsize the idols in our hearts, the propensity to trust — our homes (v.11) or land, the approval of friends, coworkers and family (v.13), and our earthly talents and treasure (v.18) — just to name a few. We can be grateful to God for those things, for certain, but let us not distract our hope at the cross for even an hour. Lord, help us in this.

    Let us learn this lesson now! Its not too late to exercise our good and Godly purposes to do His will. And may it begin in our prayers.

    Praise God for this very hour, my friends. Be encouraged!

  2. Reminded me that comparison kills contentment. The moment I start comparing my life to the things and the people around me is the moment I take my eyes off of the Lord who provides abundant peace and contentment in Him. Great post, praying the Psalms is an awesome challenge.

  3. 1 John 2:15-17 reminds us, do not love the world or any thing of the world, to keep our eyes on the father, heaven bound.

  4. Great recommendation to pray through Psalms. I’ve done that before but didn’t think about it as we’re getting ready to go through the book this summer. I will include this during my jumpstart devotions over the next few months.

  5. Praying through the Psalms has been the most helpful advice I have ever received for my prayer life. I find myself more focused and excited to pray daily. Verses 7-9 stick out to me today. It reminds me of one of my favorite songs, “My Worth Is Not in What I Own,” by the Gettys. Check it out!

  6. Looking forward to praying through the Psalms with you all this summer! Thanks for sharing the video Graham!

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