July 7, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 30

Jeremiah 30 is a passage of Scripture that provides hope. Put yourself into the Israelites shoes. You were exiled and serving another nation for several years. It was probably very harsh conditions and extensive manual labor. It probably felt like God had turned his back on you and the nation. But then, Jeremiah receives this revelation from God. There is going to be a restoration for you and your people. There is so much excitement, anticipation, and hope for this day. 

Here is the thing: If you are a believer in Jesus, aren’t you anticipating the same thing? Aren’t you waiting for God to restore you and all the other believers? Our story right now is similar in many ways to the Israelites during this time. We are living in a wicked and corrupt age, and this has been since sin entered into the world. But things continually seem to be getting worse. It is almost as if the wicked are winning right now. But that is not what God has planned. God has a plan of restoration into His Kingdom. God is preparing to take His people back to the Garden of Eden. 

I think the hope of the passage comes from verse 9. God tells Jeremiah that people are going to serve Him and David. David has already lived, reigned, and died so God is not talking about David specifically. Instead, God is describing Jesus, the one who will reign forever. Through Jesus, people can restore their relationship with God the Father. What once was broken, can now be restored through the cross. 

By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

July 6, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 29

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again; the Babylonian Exile, second only to the Exodus, is the most significant event of the Old Testament. As we have seen in Jeremiah, God’s Covenant People were betraying the commands of God. Bad kings and worse prophets led the nation into spiritual ruin. Yet, God’s plans will not be thwarted

All the way back in Deuteronomy 28, God laid out his contingency plan for disobedience— ‘The people rebelled, by golly, they’ll reap what they’ve sown’ (not an official translation). If they don’t want God’s guiding hand in their lives, they won’t have His strong arm for protection. Multiple warnings were sent through the prophets and all were ignored. 

In today’s passage, we find Jeremiah in Jerusalem during the Exile. He sent letters to those in Exile with somewhat surprising messages. In verses 5–6, we see an encouragement to continue with life, marriage, and family. Verse 7, even more surprising, the great prophet encourages God’s people to pray for Babylon and seek its welfare. 

 Jeremiah’s letters contain much about the falsity of the contemporary prophets. One of the primary messages they gave was that the Exile would be over very soon. We’ve seen this in previous chapters. They were declaring a short return from Exile. Jeremiah reiterates the timeframe previously given in chapter 25—”When seventy years have been completed for Babylon, I will visit you and fulfill My good word to you, to bring you back to this place. The point? The Exile would last for a long time.

Make no mistake, God orchestrated these events. Notice the 5 times God says, “I sent,” in our passage. Ultimately, the Exile was to bring about good. Read these words, reminiscent of Deuteronomy 30; “ For I know the plans that I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans for welfare and not for calamity to give you a future and a hope. Then you will call upon Me and come and pray to Me, and I will listen to you. You will seek Me and find Me when you search for Me with all your heart.  I will be found by you,’ declares the Lord, ‘and I will restore your fortunes and will gather you from all the nations and from all the places where I have driven you,’ declares the Lord, ‘and I will bring you back to the place from where I sent you into exile.’

These words were partially fulfilled at the end of Exile, they will be eternally fulfilled when Christ, who suffered the shame of the cross, returns to reclaim what is His—exiles. 

Two things we should learn: First, the time in which we live as the Church is similar to that of the Babylonian Exile. This world is not our home, we are strangers and aliens in a far off and distant land (1 Peter 2:11–12; Phil 3:20; Eph 2:19; Heb 11:13). God will regather His people for eternity.

Second, one of the striking things about this time period is the fact that ancient warfare was interpreted theologically. If a nation wins or loses, it’s because that nation’s god was stronger or weaker than their opponent. So, when Babylon crushed Jerusalem, the name of Yahweh was defamed. Herein lies a great truth—God is willing to suffer shame in order that people might turn their hearts to Him (see also Hebrews 12:2). The Creator suffered ridicule from creation. That’s how much God loves humanity. When we’re tempted to question His character, we can remember His selflessness in taking our shame. 

By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

July 4, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 28

When reading Jeremiah 28, it is important to understand what happens directly before this. In Jeremiah 27:22, God tells Jeremiah, “Then I will bring them back and restore them to this place.” In that section, God is talking about the things of the Temple, but it can also be implied that God is talking about Israel as a whole. Israel will be taken to Babylon and serve them, but God will bring them back. 

This leads to our passage because Hananiah comes onto the scene and proclaims that God will restore Israel in two years. Hananiah said he received revelation from the Lord and this is what was going to happen. This actually makes Jeremiah happy because he wants Israel to be brought back into the land (v. 6). But, as we see from the passage, Hananiah was lying and he did not actually receive this revelation (v. 13-16). God then punishes Hananiah by ending his life because of the wickedness (v. 17). 

For us, we need to be careful about the Pastors and Teachers that we are listening to. Hananiah tricked many people into believing his words. The problem is that his words were not true. In the same way, there are false teachers still in our world today. People who claim “truth” but really just state their opinion and use God/the Bible in whatever way they want to. Our job is to watch for false teachers, not listen to their lies, and call them out for their wickedness. Always pay attention to the Biblical teachers in your life. Make sure that what they say aligns with what God has to say through His Word. 

My challenge to you this week is to examine your teachers. Examine if they are truly basing everything they are saying off of Scripture. Ask yourself, “Is the Bible the driving force behind their teaching?” It never hurts to ask these questions. It will show you one of two things: (1) you need to stop listening to them or (2) it will give you better confidence in them. 

By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

July 3, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 27

Sometimes we forgot how in control God is at all times. We look at the pandemic, murders, war, famine, and natural disasters and perceive the world as being in total chaos. Which to us would be totally out of control. There is nothing you or I can do to stop a tornado if it was heading straight for our houses. The world is trying to come up with a solution for COVID 19 and we don’t have any so we perceive it as completely out of control.

The problem with that outlook is that sometimes I think we put God in the same position as us. We don’t trust that he is in control, but verse 5 tells us something about God when it says, “It is I who by my great power and my outstretched arm have made the earth, with the men and animals that are on the earth, and I give it to whomever it seems right to me.”

To the Israelites, things probably seemed out of control. This nation has come in and taken over. The people want to take matters into their own hands and rebel against him, but God says these words to his people. He says this not to stop the conflict, but instead to remind the people that he is still in control. That’s something that we should continue to remember today. That God is in control!

By: Jacob Kerr — West Campus Pastoral Ministry Apprentice – Students & Worship


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.