October 19, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 18

Today, I want to just focus on one verse:

23 Have I any pleasure in the death of the wicked, declares the Lord GOD, and not rather that he should turn from his way and live?

As much as God hates sin, this verse should bring comfort in seeing that while God must deal swiftly, the greater desire of his heart would be that sinners would repent and turn from their sin toward God. This goes against the stereotypical (and un-Biblical) assumption that the Old Testament God is a God of wrath, and the New Testament God is a God of grace. God is just and gracious, and these two truths are not mutually exclusive.

God’s heart is that we would repent and walk with Him. The next time you fall into the snare of sin, remember that God desires you to come back to Him. He is not surprised by your sin. Be reminded of what Jesus says to you in the gospels:

Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. Matthew 11:28

 By: Graham Withers — Associate Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

October 17, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 17

The story of Ezekiel 17 explained in simpler way: One great eagle transplants a twig from the cedar tree and a seed. The seed becomes a great vine, but a second lesser eagle comes along and attracts the vine. The vines attraction leads it to draw away from the first eagle. 

The story is a parable and thus has a deeper meaning. The meaning is this: The first eagle is Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon. He takes Judah’s king Jehoiachin (the twig) to Babylon. The seed is Zedekiah, who is the royal offspring discussed in verse 13. Zedekiah’s failure is that he broke a covenant with Nebuchadnezzar and followed the king of Egypt (the lesser eagle in our story.) Zedekiah put his hope in a nation rather than God. Ultimately, Zedekiah rejected God’s covenant (v. 19) and because of this, disaster is about to come upon him (v. 20-21). 

The thing I think we can takeaway from this chapter is how easily humans trust in worldly things. We have all done this before in our lives. We believe money will solve all our problems. Or we believe that a relationship will fix the loneliness that we feel. Or we think we can receive true happiness when we get a job promotion. But all of these are temporary fixes to a permanent problem. Zedekiah believed Egypt was a better help to him than God was. He looked at their military ability and thought “Those are the people I need on my side”, not realizing that God who wiped out the whole Egyptian army with a sea was on his side, if he would just seek Him. Zedekiah’s failure was his trust in worldly things. 

So let me ask you: where are you putting your trust? In the God of the universe who is all-powerful, all-knowing, and covenant keeping? Or in the world who fades away and changes? 

 By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

October 16, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 16

Ezekiel 16 uses remarkably vivid imagery to describe God’s relationship with his Covenant people. Jerusalem is the baby with the uncut umbilical cord—unwashed, unloved, left in it’s filth to die. It was the Lord who found the baby, saved the baby, and raised the baby. When the child was raised, the Lord covered her. When the time was right, the Lord established a covenant illustrated with a marriage vow. Faithfulness did not last long for Jerusalem who quickly played the harlot. 

For as unfaithful as God’s Covenant people were, His redeeming love was and is unshakable. Verses 59–63 make clear that even when the covenant is broken, God will establish an “everlasting covenant.” God says HE will make atonement. Hopefully, this sounds familiar.

In the harlotry of Israel, God established the New Covenant. This covenant was bought with the blood of Christ and sealed with the Holy Spirit poured into the hearts of believers on the Day of Pentecost. 

As I read this story, I’m reminded of the words of the late great preacher Haddon Robinson, that the Lord does not love us for what we do, He loves us in spite of what we do. Robinson literally wrote the book on preaching, and as you dwell on this passage, I encourage you to listen to his sermon on Hosea.  You can find the link here.

 By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

October 15, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 15

Chapter 15 is a word from the Lord (through Ezekiel) of prophecy against the people of Israel.  They have continued to disobey God and follow false gods – even though God repeatedly warned them.  They refused to repent and change.

Just a note – this is prior to the cross.  People obtained righteousness through obedience to God and confession of their sin (looking forward to the ultimate forgiveness to come on the cross).  God was still gracious – but the punishment was clear to come to those who disobey.  We live in the time since the cross.  As Christ followers, our sins are all forgiven by the blood of Jesus.

God made Him who  knew no sin to be sin for us… 2 Corinthians 5:21a

Because of Israel’s repeated disobedience, God has turned His blessing from them and has become their judge.

I will set my face against them… (v.7)

What can we learn from this about our disobedience?

God is serious about sin.

We joke about it – make excuses for it – act like it doesn’t matter – but God is serious about sin.  He was so serious about it – that the cross had to happen.  Sin is no laughing or light matter – any sin is a big deal to God.

The discipline of God (to bring about correction in His people) is swift and powerful.

As God’s people living past the cross, we are forgiven of all of our sin.  God is never vindictive or punitive toward us.  However, sin has consequence – both natural and from God.  God will act in our lives as a disciplinarian to get our attention about our undealt with sin.

Our best response is repentance.

When we are made aware of our sin – no matter how small in our eyes – our best response is to repent.  To confess it God and take immediate action steps to remove it and avoid it.  Accountability is a must.

God is kind, patient, and willing to forgive and restore.

God is so gracious to us – giving us what we absolutely do not deserve and so merciful – not giving us what we truly deserve.  He is always kind and eternally patient.  He always stands ready to forgive and restore.

 By: Tim Parsons — Lead Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.