May 27, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 4:1-18

Jeremiah 4:1-4 is a continuation of chapter 3. God is calling Israel to repentance in this section. Repentance includes removing the ‘detestable things’ (v. 1), circumcising the heart (v. 4), and returning to the Lord (v. 1). And notice that if Israel would repent then blessings would fall upon them (v. 2). Do you know that God has promised blessings to those who repent now? He promises things like eternal life, the fruits of the Spirit, forgiveness, all of which are blessings. God wanted Israel to return to a right relationship with Him, and He wants that same personal relationship with each of us today. 

The rest of our section, verses 5-18, are about the destruction that Israel is about to face. They have continued in their disobedience and have not returned to God. God is telling Jeremiah to go and proclaim that a northern nation is coming to lay their land desolate. Upon reading this, what God says is going to happen will happen. The northern nation that is coming is Babylon. From history, we know that Babylon comes and destroys and exiles people from Israel, which is exactly what God is telling Jeremiah in this section. Israel continued in their wickedness and brought condemnation upon themselves. God wanted that relationship, but Israel was too busy worshiping idols. 

For us, what idols distract you from your relationship with God? What sins do you need to repent of in your life?

By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Apprentice


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

May 26, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 3

Famed investor Warren Buffett said, “It’s good to learn from your mistake. It’s better to learn from other people’s mistakes.” 

Although I recognize not only the humor but the truth of those words, I often fail to live by them. Verbally or non-verbally I declare, “I will only learn from that which I myself fail.” This isn’t always true for any of us, but it’s often truer than we wished for most of us. Whereas the writer of Hebrews says, “Since we have so great a cloud of witnesses surrounding us…” (Hebrews 12:1), implying that we must follow them, learn from them, and overcome their failings, we still manage to make the same mistakes they did. 

Reading Jeremiah 3, I see that our error isn’t unique to us, but is thousands of years old. Two things stood out to me reading Jeremiah 3. The first is obviously the failure of Judah to learn from Israel’s sin, but the second, is that no matter how far people fall, God’s call is to return.

In verses 6–10, the Lord stated clearly, “Have you seen what faithless Israel did?… she did not return…I sent her away… yet her treacherous sister Judah did not fear.” Judah had seen the failure of Israel spiritually, and then physically. They remained unrepentant and were eventually overtaken by the nation of Assyria. And, although Judah escaped the clutches of the Assyrian war-machine, they cannot escape the judgment of the Lord. Israel’s destruction began with a spiritual failure. Yet, notice the words of the Lord. Even though they had turned their back on Him, He gave them time and opportunity to “return.”

In the NASB translation of Jeremiah 3, the word “return” occurs 7 times. Despite the harlotry of His people, God wants them back. That is the overwhelming message of Hosea, written to Israel before its destruction. Israel did not listen, now Judah is falling into the same trap. 

If you know your Bible, you know that Jeremiah’s message of repentance falls on deaf ears, and Judah is taken into exile by the nation of Babylon. It is in the Babylonian Exile that we understand the words from Deuteronomy 30, 

So it shall be when all of these things have come upon you, the blessing and the curse which I have set before you, and you call them to mind in all nations where the Lord your God has banished you, and you return to the Lord your God and obey Him with all your heart and soul according to all that I command you today, you and your sons, then the Lord your God will restore you…”

What we see in Jeremiah 3, and more importantly, a major theme of Scripture is God’s love of repentance. Despite our capacity (or lack thereof) to learn from mistakes, God provides ample opportunity for restoration. 

Christian history contains thousands of years of victories and mistakes from which we can learn. Many are included within the pages of Scripture. While spiritual failure may lead to destruction, repentance, and humility lead to restoration. This truth has been witnessed countless times over many years. 

No matter where you find yourself today, it’s not too late—”Return!”

By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

May 25, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 2:14-37

The book of Jeremiah is all about Israel’s sin of disobedience – and God’s call to repentance.  Jeremiah is a powerful prophet – who calls God’s people back to Him.

As we learned yesterday, the Lord presents His case against His people.

I remember how eager you were to please me as a young bride long ago, how you loved me and followed me even through the barren wilderness.  In those days Israel was holy to the Lord, the first of his children. (2:2-3)

Therefore, I will bring my case against you,” says the Lord… (2:9)

It sounds a lot like the church of Ephesus…

But I have this complaint against you. You don’t love me or each other as you did at first! Look how far you have fallen! Turn back to me and do the works you did at first.  Revelation 2:2-5

They did two deadly things…

For my people have done two evil things:

1)  They have abandoned me— the fountain of living water.

2)  And they have dug for themselves cracked cisterns

that can hold no water at all! [tried to find fulfillment elsewhere] (v.13)

Today’s reading tells us the results of Israel’s sin.  Sin always has consequences.

Don’t be misled—you cannot mock the justice of God. You will always harvest what you plant.  Galatians 6:7

  • Israel became slaves (v.14)
  • The wealth was plundered (v.14)
  • The land and towns were destroyed (v.15)
  • Their enemies marched in against them (.16)

Their sin brought all of this on them…

And you have brought this upon yourselves by rebelling against the Lord your God, even though he was leading you on the way!  Your wickedness will bring its own punishment.  Your turning from me will shame you.  You will see what an evil, bitter thing it is to abandon the Lord your God and not to fear him. (v. 17, 19)

God said they have forgotten Him (v.21b) and acted like an unfaithful wife.  James talks about this in chapter 4…

You adulterers! Don’t you realize that friendship with the world makes you an enemy of God? I say it again: If you want to be a friend of the world, you make yourself an enemy of God. (James 4:4)

How have you abandoned and forgotten God?  How have you committed spiritual adultery – not honoring your commitment to Him alone?  Repent – the words of Jeremiah still ring true today.

By: Tim Parsons — Lead Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

May 23, 2020

Today you should read: Jeremiah 2:1-13

The flow of this conversation feels almost like a breakup would. First, God tells them how he remembers how they once loved Him. He then asks what he did he that made them not love him anymore. Then God tells them about how they wronged him. So although it sounds like a breakup, it doesn’t end that way because God wants to fight for his people’s love.

God calls the people out multiple times during this talk. He says how they “went after worthlessness, and became worthless” (v. 5) and how they destroyed His land (v. 7). He then points out how crazy it is for a nation to change gods while also pointing out that those other gods are not real (v. 11). Verse 13 ends by saying how they chose to abandon the living water for cisterns that cannot hold water.

Sometimes I think we are no different than the Israelites. We may have started off with a burning passion for God and would do anything for Him, but now have tapered off and do just what we need to do in order to rest our conscience.

 I feel like a lot of us can relate to verse 13. I know I try to take things into my own hands. I abandon God’s plan and try and write my own future, but quickly God changes those plans. I try and fill my life with things that I think will be enough, but they ultimately fall short. Why do we abandon the living water? Why do we abandon God who has never failed to fulfill? Why do we turn to the god of sports, the god of pop culture, the god of money, the god of lust, or anything else to fulfill when only God can? Seems crazy, right?

By: Jacob Kerr — West Campus Pastoral Ministry Apprentice: Students & Worship


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.