March 28, 2020

Today you should read: Galatians 4:1-7

Let’s take a brief recap of verses from chapter 3 to get our bearings on what Paul is saying in our passage today:

13 Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree— 14 so that in Christ Jesus the blessing of Abraham might come to the Gentiles, so that we might receive the promised Spirit through faith.

19 Why then the law? It was added because of transgressions, until the offspring should come to whom the promise had been made.

24 So then, the law was our guardian until Christ came, in order that we might be justified by faith.

29 And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise.

As we start in chapter 4, Paul makes another illustration of what the Law is like—a guardian. This image is that of a child’s caretaker. I don’t know about you, but for me, the one person who comes to mind when I think of this role is Alfred Pennyworth.

There was a young man who went into the city with his parents for a show. After the show, while walking through an alley, this young man’s parents died in a robbery gone wrong. The young man, whose name was Bruce, was taken under the care of the household steward, Alfred. Although Alfred raised Bruce as a surrogate parent, he was still a hired worker. Bruce was the boss, but he was a child and under the authority of his guardian. Eventually, when Bruce grew up, at the time set in his father’s will, he inherited the Wayne family fortune.

The Law given to Moses accomplished several things, but ultimately, it was temporary. It was in authority only “until the offspring should come”—Jesus. Christ came at the “fullness” of time. The word here is often translated as “complete” or “perfect.” Space does not allow to share all that God had done to prepare the world for the Messiah after the close of the Old Testament. Two of the major highlights include 1. common language, and 2. a safe way to travel.

When Jesus came, Rome had greater world-wide power than any empire before or since. Also, those carrying the message of the Gospel could travel safer than any other previous time in history thanks to romans roads and Pax Romana(the peace of Rome). And, they were able to speak with groups of people using a language that everybody understood—Greek, the trade language of the day. Not only that, but this whole preparation later allowed for a Jewish man, a pharisee, from the backwater of nowhere, who happened to be a citizen of this great empire, to take the message of the Gospel to the very seat of power in an appeal to Caesar.

Jesus came at the perfect time in history that his message could be shared effectively to the world. He came to bring salvation, not through works, but through his death. He was born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law. Through Christ, we have received adoption. We are co-heirs, benefitting from His inheritance. In addition, through Christ we receive the gift of his Spirit, whose unique relationship with the Father allows us to cry out with Him, “Abba.” We are justified and sanctified because we are no longer under the guardian, but inheritors of the Father.

By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

March 27, 2020

Today you should read: Galatians 3:15-29

 This chapter is one that is considered controversial to some. Paul has already mentioned a couple times in Galatians how some of the Jewish Christians had twisted the Gospel to force the Gentiles to adhere to Jewish laws. In yesterday’s reading, Paul pointed this out directly to them, asking them in verses 2 and 3, “Did you receive the Spirit by works of the law or by hearing with faith? Are you so foolish?” He made the distinction that the law doesn’t save, but faith does. Now he has to answer the question, “Why does the law exist?” 

This is a question that a lot of new Christians or non-Christians don’t know the answer to: “Why do the Old Testament laws exist and do we need to follow them?” The Mosaic Law (or the Law of Moses) had a couple different purposes. One of those purposes was to show the people that they weren’t perfect and have a sin nature. We talked all about this whenever we went through Leviticus not that long ago. The other purpose was as a guardian (v. 24). Their works couldn’t save them, only faith could. Paul referenced Genesis 15:6 earlier in this chapter; that Abraham’s belief was counted to him as righteousness, and that same faith counted for the people. Likewise as Abraham’s faith led to obedience, their faith should also lead to obedience. This doesn’t not go the other way around. Their obedience does not lead to faith, but instead obedience should be a byproduct of faith. Paul goes into more depth about the law in Romans 7 and 8. He finishes this chapter with this cry that we are no longer bound by the law. No longer Jew nor Greek, neither slave nor free, no male or female, but one in Christ Jesus!

By: Jacob Kerr — West Campus Pastoral Ministry Apprentice: Worship & Students


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

March 26, 2020

Today you should read: Galatians 3:1-14

Up to this point in Galatians, we have seen that there is some theological trouble with the church and it is still what Paul is dealing with in our passage today. Paul, in our passage, is showing the Galatians that righteousness comes by faith, not by works. At some point, there must have been some false teachers that persuaded the Galatians that the only way to obtain righteousness was by good works. 

If I can be honest, don’t many of us think this way? Even if we know that righteousness comes by faith, there are often times where we think, “God will like me more if I do this” or “God doesn’t like me because of what I have done”. That could not be any further from the truth. God’s love is unconditional; it does not change based upon how good or bad we have been lately. Paul could say to us, “O foolish Christians!”

And so, we need to be thankful that righteousness comes by faith and not by keeping the works of the law. Paul provides us with a great example of righteousness by faith: Abraham. In the Old Covenant, God’s people were to keep the Law. The problem is that nobody could keep the Law perfectly (v. 10). So Abraham was not righteous because he kept the law; instead he was righteous because he listened and obeyed God. For us then, righteousness comes through faith in Jesus (v. 13). 

Today, if you have a relationship with Jesus, be reminded that you are righteous because of Jesus Christ. God does not love you any more or any less because of the things you do. Instead, when He sees you, He sees you clean because you have been covered by the blood of Jesus.

By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Apprentice


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

March 25, 2020

Today you should read: Galatians 2:11-21

Church conflicts are not fun. For pastors, leaders, members and attenders. It’s not fun for the body of Christ and it’s not good as a witness to a lost world around us. I remember serving at a church that had 6 multi-campuses where one of the campuses met in a large church building with only ¼ of the people filling up the sanctuary. Several of those people refused to give up their seats when half the sanctuary was blocked by curtains. Several of those people literally sat behind the curtains, not seeing the preacher, band or the rest of the congregation! Again, church conflicts are not fun. But as long as we live in a fallen world with fallen people, we will have them. We see one such conflict in verses 11-14.

In verses 13-14, we see how Peter was hypocritical concerning the gospel and how his conduct was not in step with the truths of it. Peter was telling the gentiles that they needed to continue to practice Jewish customs. This is why the apostle Paul tells this church that he opposed him face to face in verse 11. We need to remember that sometimes this is needed. In the church, we need to be willing to graciously call each other out with Gospel matters. Although conflict will happen, we must face it when we’re protecting the life-changing gospel message. Verses 15-21 show this even more. Paul shares how Christ died for us and we died with Christ and that we can’t save ourselves but are only justified through Jesus. We now live in Christ. We don’t have to live for the law, but trying to obtain salvation through the law goes against the grace given in the gospel (v. 21). That is a part of the purpose of the Gospel and why we must fight for it, even in uncomfortable conflicts concerning it.

By: Erik Koliser — West Campus Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.