February 22, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 4

In Leviticus 4, God is instructing Moses about what the people of Israel shall do if they sin. This is an important chapter because all people have sinned. For the Israelites, I am sure they probably ‘highlighted’ this section of Scripture so they knew how to please God with their sacrifices for sin. 

The interesting part of this chapter is that it focuses on unintentional sins. In verse 2, it is about a person committing an unintentional sin. Then, in verse 13, it is for all of Israel. Then, in verse 22, it is for leaders. Last, in verse 27, it is for common people. What God is telling Moses is that when someone sins unintentionally, God is still offended by it, and they need to sacrifice an animal to the Lord. This shows that God takes all sin serious, intentional or unintentional. 

As believers, I think our mindset sometimes is that, “Well I didn’t mean to do it so God should forgive me” or “I didn’t even know I did it. Why should I ask for forgiveness for something I didn’t know I had done?” But from reading Leviticus 4, we have to recognize that if we have sinned unintentionally then we still need to repent and ask God for forgiveness. That is what God is instructing Moses to do with the people of Israel.

Take time right now and pray. Ask God to reveal to you unintentional sins that you have committed in your life. Then, when you recognize them, ask for forgiveness. Do this every week. You might be surprised at what God reveals to you. 

By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Apprentice


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

February 21, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 3

The first two offerings we see in the book of Leviticus were the burnt and grain offerings. Today we look at the peace offering. This offering offers peace between those who offer and the Lord. It dealt with a communion type meal between the person making the offering, the priest and the Lord. Of course, to get that meal one had to offer a sacrifice of their unblemished animal, kill it in front of the tent of meeting, drain the blood, go through some specific cutting procedures to get rid of the fat and then the priest burns it all up which created an aroma that was pleasing to the lord and brought fellowship with Him once again. 

This all was done as a foreshadowing of our great sacrificial lamb, Jesus who was without sin but took our sin upon Himself on the cross and through repentance and faith we receive fellowship and peace with God once again. Not only is this a foreshadowing of the Gospel but also the sacrament that Jesus left the church to remind us of this sacrifice every time we receive a similar communion in the Lord’s Supper.  It was Him inviting us to a feast upon the Lamb that was slain by eating the bread which symbolizes the flesh of the sacrifice and drinking the cup which symbolizes His blood. When we partake of the Lord’s Supper we demonstrate to God that we accept His peace offering.

26 Now as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and after blessing it broke it and gave it to the disciples, and said, “Take, eat; this is my body.” 27 And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he gave it to them, saying, “Drink of it, all of you, 28 for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins. 29 I tell you I will not drink again of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.” Matthew 26:26-29

By: Erik Koliser — West Campus Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

February 20, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 2

The book of Leviticus is primarily how to deal with sin and impurity. The first several chapters all revolve around giving offerings to the Lord. The ESV Study Bible says, “The use of fine flour as well as the costly spice frankincense suggests that the Israelites were to present their very best to the Lord.”

The importance of these offerings should remind us of Genesis 4:

Now Abel was a keeper of sheep, and Cain a worker of the ground. In the course of time Cain brought to the Lord an offering of the fruit of the ground, and Abel also brought of the firstborn of his flock and of their fat portions. And the Lord had regard for Abel and his offering, but for Cain and his offering he had no regard.

God gives the reason why in verse 7:

If you do well, will you not be accepted? And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is contrary to you, but you must rule over it.”

Even though Leviticus and the books of the law focus on obeying the law externally, the internal obedience of the law is still just as important. God desires that we obey and respond to him in a pure heart that is an overflow of true love for Him.

By: Graham Withers — Pastoral Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

February 19, 2020

Today you should read: Leviticus 1

Leviticus is a book about the Law of the Lord. It shows all through the Holiness of God and how we could never keep God’s law to perfection. Here is a quick overview video:

 

In the beginning of this book God is telling Moses to instruct the people with what He is about to tell him (v. 1-2). The first chapter in particular is about the ritual of burnt offerings. Though the Israelites in reality did this was foreshadowing of what was to come in Jesus. There were strict requirements:

  1. Perfect (v. 3, 10)
  2. Blood had to be spilt (v. 5)
  3. The skin had to be cut (v. 6,12)

There were other requirements but when we look at these we see Jesus. Jesus was perfect. His blood was spilt for us. He was lashed and beaten for us. He did this in order to make us right with God just like in verse 4. But Jesus didn’t just provide a temporary cover or “fix” of our actions… He brought us from death to life. He fixed our heart. 

This made me think of Psalm 51:16-17:

16 You do not desire a sacrifice, or I would offer one.  You do not want a burnt offering. 17  The sacrifice you desire is a broken spirit. You will not reject a broken and repentant heart, O God.

This is why Jesus came. He came not to set us free from the requirements of the law but the burden of the law (performing for our salvation). We are free to obey and grow in holiness. We are free now to obey the heart behind the law. Jesus became our sacrifice to make this possible.

Just like the burnt offerings in Leviticus, Jesus was substitutionary – He took our place.

How can you live in this truth & praise God? What do you need to give to God today and walk in the light in?

By: Nick Parsons — Pastoral Ministry Associate: College


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.