October 27, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 25

In Ezekiel 25 we see the phrase “Thus says the Lord GOD…” several different times to the neighboring nations of Judah. These are prophecies of judgments upon nations for their impurity and oppression, similar to what we see today with countries that practice similar sins.

We cannot expect societies to flourish who don’t care about integrity and people. Whether deemed a “Christian” nation or not, political structures will not stay in tact when they don’t have a conscience in doing right and treating people fairly. We’ve seen this throughout history and in the Bible. And just like “Thus says the Lord God…” is repeated, most prophecies of judgments are repeatedly concluded with “Then they will know that I am the Lord.”

We will know the Lord’s standards of sin and righteousness and can’t escape God’s expectations and consequences for ignoring His commands. 

 By: Erik Koliser — West Campus Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

October 26, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 24

This chapter is a challenging one to wrestle with, but another great opportunity that every part of God’s Word is inspired by God himself,  and is therefore completely true and trustworthy. This chapter deals with two parallel types of losses: the loss of the city of Jersusalem to the Babylonians and the loss of Ezekeil’s wife. The ESV Study Bible summarizes the chapter this way:

Although not explicitly linked, the two losses recounted here almost certainly belong together, and they come at a turning point in Ezekiel’s prophetic career. The first loss (vv. 1–14) is that of the city of Jerusalem—with a Babylonian siege launched, it is the beginning of the end. The second loss, that of Ezekiel’s own wife (vv. 15–24), triggers his most poignant symbolic action. Finally (vv. 25–27), the promise of the end is made, linking this chapter back to the prologue and forward to what lies beyond the destruction of Jerusalem.

On one hand, it might be hard to understand why God would tell Ezekiel not to mourn the loss of his wife, who is the delight of his eyes. This is really an exception to the pattern that is laid out in the rest of the Old Testament in regards mourning the death of people. In other words, this is a description of what Ezekiel was told to do, not a prescription of how we should respond at the loss of a loved one. Ezekiel is ultimately modeling for the people of Israel what it looks like to be obey God even when it is hard. “So you will be a sign to them, and they will know that I am the LORD.” (v 27) This can also serve as a reminder to us that as much as God calls us to love people, and especially our family, he still should reign supreme, and what we love and value most in life. This obviously does not mean that you should not mourn when you lose someone you love, but rather to make sure that you don’t love them more than you love God.

 By: Graham Withers — Associate Pastor


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

October 24, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 23

The message of Ezekiel 23 is simplistic, but the outcome is terrible. Oholah is symbolic for Samaria, and Oholibah is symbolic for Jerusalem. With both “sisters”, they belonged to the Lord but they went whoring after other nations. The language of the text is so strong. They didn’t just commit adultery once, but they actively pursued rebellion against the Lord by trusting and desiring for the other nations. The outcome for both: destruction. 

The irony of this passage is that Samaria and Jerusalem loved the other nations, and yet the other nations turned and destroyed them. Assyria conquers Samaria (v. 9) and Babylon conquers Jerusalem (v. 17). The nations they whored after ultimately brought destruction upon them. 

Often times, the things of this world look pleasing, promising, and purposeful. Satan wants it this way. He wants us to lust and whore after worldly things, because when we do, we turn our back on God. Then the things we lusted after, only bring about more problems. Satan has been doing this since the beginning. Adam and Eve whored after the fruit, and the penalty was sin coming into the world. 

What worldly items have you been lusting/whoring after? How have they distracted you from God?

 By: Brice Stockton — Student Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.

October 23, 2020

Today you should read: Ezekiel 22

“…but me you have forgotten.”

As the Lord declares all the “abominations” of Israel, he lists some pretty terrible things. However, all these things are summed up in this, “but me you have forgotten.” In verse 26, speaking of the priests, the Lord said they “made no distinction between the holy and the common.” In these two ideas, we find the shattered foundation of defiled religion. 

Two majorly major themes that carry through the whole Bible are “Remember the Lord” and “Be Holy for I am Holy.” The Israelites before and the Church after have found themselves in awful circumstances for failing to follow these two commands that carry throughout the totality of Scripture. Every abomination listed finds its roots here—you cannot do the wickedness and perversion found in this chapter if you actively remind yourself of the Lord and His goodness while also pursuing holiness. 

In verse 31, again for all the consequences, the indignation and consuming fire, we find the source, “I have returned their way upon their heads.” Obviously, the Lord used (and uses) a variety of circumstances to get His people’s attention—including the wicked Babylonians. However, have we ever considered that bearing the brunt of the Lord’s indignation or His consuming fire is just reaping the natural consequences of our own sin? With the awfulness that humanity inflicts on themselves and others, the Lord only need not spare us for the consuming fire to ignite. Our sin keeps the pilot light lit, but only the Holy Spirit keeps turning the gas knob down.

How do we “Remember the Lord?” Obviously, celebrating worship on the first day of the week is a biggie. However, that should only account for some of our remembrance—daily time in the Word, praying, and other disciplines help us “remember.” There are also special seasons of remembrance like holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries that we stop and say, “Only by the grace of God go I.” 

The charge of making “no distinction between the holy and the common” should challenge us. I’ve defined holiness as “set apart for an intended use,” but with a connotation of reverence. When we had a cat and I used the litter scooper, the thing was definitely “set apart for intended use,” but was not quite celebrated. Holiness assumes specialness. And while we’re much too good Christians to look at church and the things of God the same way as a pooper-scooper, we all must admit that we sometimes give the same “harrumph” when scooping cat doody as when fulfilling our Christian duty. 

God’s Holiness must not be small in our lives, but take up our entire vision. It’s not that we cannot use common things—games, Jamboree’s, snacks—it is simply that we must maintain the distinction between what is common and give preference to that which is holy. 

Let us Remember the Lord and Be Holy. In keeping these two mighty commands of Scripture, we can avoid the fate and consequence of abomination. 

 By: Tyler Short — Connections Ministry Associate


God is honored when we intentionally seek Him in prayer. As a church, we want dependent prayer to be something that marks us. Use the comment section to post prayer requests and experiences of how God has answered prayer and/or changed you through prayer! If you would like to be enrolled to get weekly prayer reminders, text @cpclex to 81010.